Erin go Bragh

Hope…

Tintagel, Cornwall

City Upon a Hill

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I have been engaged and pre-occupied by world politics and haven’t been writing much.

Yesterday Joe Kennedy III, who is Bobby Kennedy’s grandson and a member of the House of Representatives for Massachusetts, questioned America’s proposed brand new, shiny health bill. In fact, he forced them to admit out loud that mental health coverage was no longer a government requirement.

And then he said this:

“I was struck last night by a comment that I heard made by Speaker Ryan, where he called this repeal bill ‘an act of mercy.’ With all due respect to our speaker, he and I must have read different Scripture,” Kennedy said as the House Energy and Commerce Committee dove into the details of the GOP effort.

“The one I read calls on us to feed the hungry, to clothe the naked, to shelter the homeless, and to comfort the sick.

“It reminds us that we are judged not by how we treat the powerful, but by how we care for the least among us,” said the Brookline Democrat and scion of the most famous Massachusetts political dynasty.

“There is no mercy in a system that makes health care a luxury. There is no mercy in a country that turns their back on those most in need of protection: the elderly, the poor, the sick, and the suffering. There is no mercy in a cold shoulder to the mentally ill,” he said, appearing to read from notes.

“This is not an act of mercy. It is an act of malice,” he said.

After discovering that I googled him. One of his professors at Harvard Law School was Elizabeth Warren, a former high school classmate of mine. She was a few years ahead of me but for one year she and I walked the same halls on our way to our next class.

In fact, Joe met his wife in her Harvard Law class.

I also discovered in 2011 Joe was asked to commemorate his great uncle’s “City Upon a Hill” speech. He gave it on January 9, 1961, two weeks before his presidential inauguration. I had forgotten about that speech but then I was nine when he gave it. However, I have read it often but not in a long time. So I googled it too.

Last night I read it out loud to my husband who is British. I reduced him to tears… and myself.

I share it with you here. Do what you will with it. I am not personally invested in your response or lack of one. However, as always, rudeness will not be tolerated on my comment threads.

I do recommend reading it aloud. It has so much resonance and power.

John F. Kennedy’s farewell address to the Massachusetts Legislature, Boston, January 9, 1961 (The original link can be found  HERE

“I have welcomed this opportunity to address this historic body, and, through you, the people of Massachusetts to whom I am so deeply indebted for a lifetime of friendship and trust.

“For fourteen years I have placed my confidence in the citizens of Massachusetts–and they have generously responded by placing their confidence in me.

“Now, on the Friday after next, I am to assume new and broader responsibilities. But I am not here to bid farewell to Massachusetts.

“For forty-three years–whether I was in London, Washington, the South Pacific, or elsewhere–this has been my home; and, God willing, wherever I serve this shall remain my home.

“It was here my grandparents were born–it is here I hope my grandchildren will be born.

“I speak neither from false provincial pride nor artful political flattery. For no man about to enter high office in this country can ever be unmindful of the contribution this state has made to our national greatness.

“Its leaders have shaped our destiny long before the great republic was born. Its principles have guided our footsteps in times of crisis as well as in times of calm. Its democratic institutions–including this historic body–have served as beacon lights for other nations as well as our sister states.

“For what Pericles said to the Athenians has long been true of this commonwealth: “We do not imitate–for we are a model to others.”

“And so it is that I carry with me from this state to that high and lonely office to which I now succeed more than fond memories of firm friendships. The enduring qualities of Massachusetts–the common threads woven by the Pilgrim and the Puritan, the fisherman and the farmer, the Yankee and the immigrant–will not be and could not be forgotten in this nation’s executive mansion.

“They are an indelible part of my life, my convictions, my view of the past, and my hopes for the future.

“Allow me to illustrate: During the last sixty days, I have been at the task of constructing an administration. It has been a long and deliberate process. Some have counseled greater speed. Others have counseled more expedient tests.

“But I have been guided by the standard John Winthrop set before his shipmates on the flagship Arbella three hundred and thirty-one years ago, as they, too, faced the task of building a new government on a perilous frontier.

“We must always consider,” he said, “that we shall be as a city upon a hill–the eyes of all people are upon us.”

“Today the eyes of all people are truly upon us–and our governments, in every branch, at every level, national, state and local, must be as a city upon a hill–constructed and inhabited by men aware of their great trust and their great responsibilities.

“For we are setting out upon a voyage in 1961 no less hazardous than that undertaken by the Arabella in 1630. We are committing ourselves to tasks of statecraft no less awesome than that of governing the Massachusetts Bay Colony, beset as it was then by terror without and disorder within.

“History will not judge our endeavors–and a government cannot be selected–merely on the basis of color or creed or even party affiliation. Neither will competence and loyalty and stature, while essential to the utmost, suffice in times such as these.

“For of those to whom much is given, much is required. And when at some future date the high court of history sits in judgment on each one of us–recording whether in our brief span of service we fulfilled our responsibilities to the state–our success or failure, in whatever office we may hold, will be measured by the answers to four questions:

“First, were we truly men of courage–with the courage to stand up to one’s enemies–and the courage to stand up, when necessary, to one’s associates–the courage to resist public pressure, as well as private greed?

“Secondly, were we truly men of judgment–with perceptive judgment of the future as well as the past–of our own mistakes as well as the mistakes of others–with enough wisdom to know that we did not know, and enough candor to admit it?

“Third, were we truly men of integrity–men who never ran out on either the principles in which they believed or the people who believed in them–men who believed in us–men whom neither financial gain nor political ambition could ever divert from the fulfillment of our sacred trust?

“Finally, were we truly men of dedication–with an honor mortgaged to no single individual or group, and compromised by no private obligation or aim, but devoted solely to serving the public good and the national interest.

“Courage–judgment–integrity–dedication–these are the historic qualities of the Bay Colony and the Bay State–the qualities which this state has consistently sent to this chamber on Beacon Hill here in Boston and to Capitol Hill back in Washington.

“And these are the qualities which, with God’s help, this son of Massachusetts hopes will characterize our government’s conduct in the four stormy years that lie ahead.

“Humbly I ask His help in that undertaking–but aware that on earth His will is worked by men. I ask for your help and your prayers, as I embark on this new and solemn journey.

~~~~~~~~~~~

Blessings,
10 March 2017
Sussex Coast, England

Despair is not a strategy: 15 principles of hope

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If you’re out there trying to change your neighborhood, community, city, country, or the world then this is for you. In moments when everything seems hopeless, read this to get your hope on.

1. Hope can co-exist with other feelings. Grief and hope can co-exist. Fear and hope can co-exist. Disappointment and hope can co-exist. Sadness and hope can co-exist. As poet Yehuda Amichai writes, “A man doesn’t have time in his life to have time for everything. He doesn’t have seasons enough to have a season for every purpose. Ecclesiastes was wrong about that. A man needs to love and to hate at the same moment, to laugh and cry with the same eyes, with the same hands to throw stones and to gather them, to make love in war and war in love.” Writer, historian, and activist Rebecca Solnit concurs in her book “Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities” where she writes: “A gift for embracing paradox is not the least of the equipment an activist should have.”

Read the rest here:

View story at Medium.com

Therapist Error #6: Joining a School of Psychotherapy

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Source: Therapist Error #6: Joining a School of Psychotherapy

The Gospel of Mary Magdalene, by Cynthia Bourgeault | Parabola Essay

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The Gospel of Mary Magdeline Article in Parabola Magazine

This is such an interesting article. Click the original and read the original in full. Enjoy.

The Gospel of Mary Magdalene, by Cynthia Bourgeault

January 29, 2015By Cynthia Bourgeault

It is amazing that something so tiny could pack such a punch. The Gospel of Mary Magdalene is tantalizingly brief—and frustratingly, two major sections are missing, reducing the original seventeen manuscript pages by more than half. Yet what remains is more than enough to radically overturn our traditional assumptions about the origins of Christianity. In four tightly written dialogues the gospel delivers powerful new revelations on the nature of Jesus’ teachings, the qualifications for apostleship, Mary Magdalene’s clear preeminence among the disciples, and the processes already at work in the early church that would eventually lead to her marginalization. Since it also contains a unique glimpse into the actual metaphysics on which Jesus based his teachings, this is a foundational text not only for devotees of Mary Magdalene but for all students of sacred wisdom.

The Complex Trauma Survivor Faces a Lifetime’s Worth of Bullying

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Self-Care Haven by Shahida Arabi

I am so honored and excited to have an article featured on The Meadows blog, a trusted name in trauma and addiction recovery. As one of the premier drug rehab and psychological trauma treatment centers in the country, they help change the lives of individuals through The Meadows Model, 12-step practices, and the holistic healing of mind, body and spirit. To read the rest of the article, click here.

The Complex Trauma Survivor Faces a Lifetime’s Worth of Bullying

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Photo Credit: Vortexas32 via Flickr. Creative Commons License.

By Shahida Arabi, M.A., Author

“Many abused children cling to the hope that growing up will bring escape and freedom. But the personality formed in the environment of coercive control is not well adapted to adult life. The survivor is left with fundamental problems in basic trust, autonomy, and initiative. She approaches the task of early adulthood – establishing independence and intimacy –…

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